How to Save Money on Greeting Cards

How to Stamp Greeting Card Sentiments

It’s possible to save money on your greeting cards by making them yourself. However, if you want to save more money than you spend, you almost certainly have to work out a system for getting the most out of each dollar that you spend on your supplies.

If you aren’t careful, it’s likely that you will spend more on greeting card supplies than you would have spent on buying a box of cards.

One trick to saving money is scale. You need to focus on buying supplies that will work for zillions of different cards — then working out a system for actually using the supplies, making the cards, and making enough of them that it works out to a savings.

I’ve got this down to a science, and I’m working on posting bunches of articles that will reveal these secrets to you — so that you, too, can actually save more than you spend (if you choose to apply these principles.)

For me, rubber stamps are an important part of the save-more-than-you-spend process. So one of the first installments in this series is an article about how to get the most out of your sentiment stamps.

If you’ve spent a bundle on stamps you never use, and you have “stash guilt,” but no finished cards to show for it, you definitely need to check this out. It could help you turn things around and get inspired to get out those stamps and get creating.

This is also a great article for new crafters who are interested in getting started with card-making.

Learn how to stamp greeting card sentiments.

Ideas for Crocheting With Fabric Strips

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Rag Crochet

You’ve probably seen rag rugs crocheted with fabric strips, but did you realize that you can crochet bunches of different projects with fabric instead of yarn? While rugs are ideally suited for making with this technique, there are infinite possibilities for other items that you might want to try making as well. I’ve tried crocheting rugs, tote bags, hot pads, and jewelry, but that doesn’t even begin to cover all the different possible ideas for things you could make.

This technique is often referred to as either “fabric crochet” or “rag crochet.” If you already know how to crochet, you’d use the same basic stitches you already know how to do, but with a few differences.

The most noteworthy difference I have so far encountered: usually, you would have to design and create your own rag balls before you can proceed with crocheting. (Or maybe, if you’re lucky, you could find rag balls available to buy from Etsy or similar “artsy-craftsy” online shops.)

Want to learn more? If so, you might enjoy looking at the following pages online: